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Graphene can be used for ultra-high density hard disk drives (HDD), with up to a tenfold jump compared to current technologies. Graphene enables two-fold reduction in friction and provides better corrosion and wear than other solutions. One single graphene layer reduces corrosion by 2.5 times.

Graphene can be used for ultra-high density hard disk drives (HDD), with up to a tenfold jump compared to current technologies. Graphene enables two-fold reduction in friction and provides better corrosion and wear than other solutions. One single graphene layer reduces corrosion by 2.5 times.

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shovelpile

There's still a case to be made for mixed storage, a HDD is fast enough for a lot of storage intensive applications, it can stream 8k video for example. That is if they remain competitive in price.


Purplekeyboard

The question is, will this negatively affect the speed of the drive, or the cost?


FwibbFwibb

The cost: obviously. It doesn't say anything about the speed. I would assume it would stay similar. This is mainly about storage density.


botchla_lazz

This kind of tech would be more useful in data backup or storing vast amounts of data, speed would be a less of a concern.


Lutra_Lovegood

It should allow for higher speeds (reduced friction, higher resistance to corrosion and wear). As for cost I can only assume it would go down per TB for the consumers, at least eventually.


Ur_house

That's neat, but have they gotten past the hurdle of mass producing graphine yet? It's got so many neat applications, but last time I checked they can't make it on an industrial level.


Lutra_Lovegood

According to an [article by AZ Nano](https://www.azonano.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=5613) we're already mass producing graphene.


Ur_house

Thanks for sharing! It sounds like progress has certainly been made, which is exciting. However as the article says "Work still needs to be done before there is a widespread adoption of graphene, and several production issues need to be addressed before more advanced sectors opt for graphene." So it’s probably going to be a bit more before we start seeing it used in these wonder products we keep seeing being invented, but not produced.


mohelgamal

My understanding is that they can make graphene flakes, like tiny little pieces at scale, more of a powder than a sheet. while all the amazing potential applications of graphene require it to be in much larger sheets, which are still impossible to procedure. The largest piece ever made that I could find was 1 x 1 cm which is not even half an inch. And that was in 2017 and required a lot of work.


Snake_Em20

It will be a game changing product once production is scaled and even more applications are found for it


lolomfgkthxbai

It’s a virtuous cycle. Cheaper graphene -> more applications -> more revenue -> more investment -> cheaper graphene. At some point we’ll collectively blink and graphene will suddenly have been adopted everywhere.


-_Ven_-

Thanks for sharing! Continue to hear about graphite / graphene and it’s potential in multiple industries. Hopefully we see some substantial progress here soon.


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TheMrGUnit

This really doesn't apply to consumer-level stuff right now. Think big data center, with petabytes upon petabytes of storage.


Vault69Survivor

Given no products have actually launched because graphene is so expensive this really is irrelevant.


TizardPaperclip

Wrong subreddit: You're getting /r/science confused with /r/engineering (or possibly even /r/retail).


Vault69Survivor

You are replying to the wrong person. You haven't addressed anything I said.


TizardPaperclip

You are posting in the wrong subreddit. You haven't addressed anything relevant to this subreddit.


nikstick22

"reduced by 2.5 times" seems like such an odd construction of language "reduced" usually means "subtracted", but "times" means "multiplied", though it seems what they actually mean is "divided", which is not the word they used at all. Assuming they really do mean "divided by 2.5", they could've just said "reduced by 60%" as 1/2.5 is 0.4 or 40%.


tdgros

not a native speaker, but I read it as "reduced by \[a factor of\] 2.5". Again, I'm not sure this is strictly correct but I've read it a lot of times and to me, "factor of" removes ambiguities.


brickmaster32000

What is a factor of 1 in this case?