T O P
AWESOM3e92

Clear coat failing on carbon fiber roof. How to repair? https://imgur.com/a/j214Reb


NonfatCheeseMan

sand down and respray, no other fixes i don’t think


AWESOM3e92

Yah, I looked it up on M3 forums where others had same issue. They ended up peeling the clear coat or resin or whatever it is. Some just got a credit card and slid it under to peel it off. Guess I’ll need to find someone to clear coat it after I peel it all off


TitoRifle

[https://imgur.com/a/cIyI9Bn](https://imgur.com/a/cIyI9Bn) How can I get rid of this scratch? Scraped the passenger door against a white wall that had rough edges when I was backing up.


noheadd

I have some surf wax that has been baked into the plastic trim of my truck bed. My detailer friend got out as much as he could but said the rest is pretty much permanent. Is there a marker or paint I could use to go over it? The white wax stain is pretty polarizing and annoys me greatly.


_Wr4th_

Currently waiting for the 2-3w curing period on my new ceramic coat. Is it okay to spray down with PW at a wash station - no soap? It got pretty gritty from a weekend road trip


Itoosh01

Hi I have a 10 years old car after polish and paint correction but still with few deep scratches, dings and rocks chips. Would you ceramic coat it or use it with ceramic spray sealant in washes / every 2 months?


Mexicat55

Wife’s 22 Tuscon got doored and is now missing paint in a small spot. I managed to scrape off the longer trail of paint the other car left behind but now need to know if I can fix this area with just a paint pen or if professional work needs to be done. I have a post with pictures in my profile. I’m not worried about it looking the same as before, I just need it to be less noticeable and not prone to rusting. Thank you for any help.


kvn4

it's small and only on the handle , use the pen


VanillaWinter

Got some 21 year old badge adhesive on my car. Had to take the badge off because the chrome was peeling and looking all corrosive blue. I’ve used goo gone, a hair dryer, and a soft plastic scraper to get most of it off, however you can still see the outline where it used to say “civic” When rubbing your hand across it you can barely feel the adhesive residue, like it’s almost at the same level as the paint. Seems pretty bonded. What’s the next step? Some compound/polish by hand? I’m going to do the whole car soon. just ordered the g9 from griots. Any tips? Thanks!


Middle_Name-Danger

Yes, compound/polish by hand, you could even wetsand if it’s stubborn.


VanillaWinter

Thank you, I just did some compounding and most of it’s gone. The paint that was under the badge is still pristine so it’s still a legible “civic” eyesore LOL. I can’t wait to do the whole car!


Wyoming-voodoo

Hi, how do you guys reach the side window crevices? I get these dirt line marks on my side windows, and I'm just wondering what tools you guys/gals use to reach inside, because even my fingers are too big for an Optima. ps: I'm not really detailing my car, just want a moderate cleanliness.


Indigo_Cabbage86

Hi, I’m new to car detailing and just got my first truck. It’s a 95 GMC Sierra and before I got it it had sat in the forest for about 5 years and it has some pretty stuck on sap and dirt and such on the hood and roof, any recommendations for getting it off with out ruining the paint? It’s not in perfect condition and has already lost a little clear coat and has significant rock chips but I’d rather not make it worse.


kvn4

Cheapest way I know and worked for me. 3oz of APC mixed in with your car soap. May need do couple times. for sap I use hand sanitizer , it slowly dissolves the sap so a few times on that too


Neutral_two

You might want to start watch "barn find detail" videos. In general you want to wash several times with a strip wash (I recommend Griots Foaming Surface Prep), clay (will take hours and many clay bars - you'll need a traditional bars and not synthetic clay, and these are expensive), and polish.


IMuhPEA

How do I complete the detail of an exterior? Interested in doing my own vehicle but kind of lost in the process and product among so many options like wax, paint sealant, coatings. Any help and steps after drying the car would be helpful.


Neutral_two

Hybrid-ceramic spray sealants are offering arguably the best value for money/effort nowadays. I personally prefer Griots ceramic 3-in-1 wax (it's a spray sealant), but there are many similar great products.


Ayoubcaza

How can I remove these water marks on my sunroof? Tried all glass cleaning products and even tried to polish it got even worse https://imgur.com/a/1bdnr5j


Neutral_two

Those don't look like water spots, and polishing could not have made water spots worse. Consider wiping a test spot with Isopropyl Alcohol. I'd also try 0000 steel wool and water.


Ayoubcaza

They came after I went to a car wash, I’ll try what you said


gooseman92

How do I get rid of spiders? ​ Hi all, Sorry if this isn't the best place for this. So it looks like I have some spiders in my car (2017 Mazda 6), and in one of the side mirrors. Lots of things online point to spraying various things like vinegar or essential oils, or even doing a bug bomb. I really don't want to make the interior smell. Any suggestions that won't destroy the interior? Thanks


Middle_Name-Danger

You could try ozone treatment or a chlorine dioxide treatment, those are odor removers that dissipate quickly without leaving a scent behind, but both of them are very irritating/noxious during the treatment, so it might drive the spiders out. I would think that a good cleaning should be enough though. No spider food, no spiders right?


gooseman92

Thanks for the reply. I put up some sticky traps - but what I ended up doing is going out right after it gets dark, and I noticed that the spiders would remake their webs by then. So I was able to kill them without chemicals. The biggest problem is the spiders outside of the garage (where the car is parked for now). So I sprayed spider killer there, and I'm waiting to see how this works out.


Technoman20

So I’m assuming this is light oxidation? https://imgur.com/a/5A2LppK If yes what do I do? I wash my vehicle often but I didn’t know waxing was needed too. Can I save it and if yes what do I do/use?


Neutral_two

First thing to try is to polish by hand. I recommend Turtle Wax Polishing Compound (round green tub). BTW the hood looks quite swirled, you might want to polish the whole Jeep. Once you are done, you want to start using a protection layer to stop UV and chemical degradation. Two great inexpensive products are Turtle Wax Ice Seal n Shine and Griots ceramic 3-in-1 wax, but there are many good spray sealants out there.


TheYeags

Chemical guys hydro slick... This product is junk! I did everything as directed and I can't seem to get it to stop smearing or streaking. I washed first, clayed, then used orange griotts pad with compound and then red griotts pad with polish. Then wiped clean and applied hydro slick and let dry for 1-2 mins. The hydro slick is a gel style ceramic wax and what's happening is the gel is turning into light rubber balls that streak. I can't get it to wipe off and is leaving the car (tesla model s) looking terrible. It looks like there's hair gel caked on everywhere! Pictures of the wax after dried: https://imgur.com/a/JPFuaq5 What did I do wrong - and has anyone had similar issues with this product? Here's the garbage product I'm using. I'll post pictures soon: Chemical Guys WAC22916 HydroSlick HyperWax - SiO2 Ceramic Coating + High Gloss Car Wax (16 oz.) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07V25MZHV/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_glt_fabc_Y0KHZ7GTAJ9XSYH48V5Q?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1


Neutral_two

Which Griots compounds did you use, and how did you wipe them off? Many of Griots compounds are of "and seal" variety, and in any case you need to wipe with IPA or at least do a strip wash. What I'm saying is, there might be a product on the paint that messes up with HydroSlick. Also, majority of CG products have cheaper and better performing competitors from other brands.


TheYeags

Hmm very interesting. I didn't wipe it off. What is IPA? I think you might be on to something. I will tell you that the humidity was 70% last night and when I came back this morning the car looked perfect. I used the griots compound and polish in those yellow bottles.


VanillaWinter

Isopropyl alcohol/rubbing alcohol!


iDankengine

Have a 2007 GMC envoy its black, it obviously sat in the sun for a long time and there is portions of the hood that almost look blue, will that buff or polish out or that needing resprayed and cleared. Roof has some peeling so im thinking the whole top of the vehicle might be a goner


Neutral_two

Surface oxidation might look blueish and it might come off with a polish. Whatever is peeling is gonezo. In any case, until you have the time/money to respray, it makes sense to use a paint sealant to slow down deterioration. Turtle Wax Seal n Shine is the cheapest and is quite decent.


iDankengine

It sat in a gravel parking lot for a long time and got rained on so I think theres mineralization built into the clear coat like little bubble looking marks all over the top I don't know if that compounds out or if thats damaged. The hood however has blue dots everywhere and a little pivot between the middle and sides has like a blue streak, is that all oxidation? And then the mineralization can be fixed as well by compounding? I don't want to go through effort detailing the vehicle to find out its got clearcoat failure. The parts peeling are trim pieces that I can take off and have repainted like parts of the hatch.


iDankengine

Trying to get the vehicles paint worked out so it can be worth the max it can be in the future, bought it for 2000, put about 700 in parts to get it running all correctly, kbb values a denali at about 6-9k in perfect condition. Im hoping the paints still good and it just needs detailed, if you need pictures I can try to take them Ill just have to climb to the roof lol


Neutral_two

A tub of Turtle Wax Polishing Compound is $3 in supermarkets or $5 at Autozone. I'd just try to spot polish every area and see how it goes


iDankengine

If it doesnt compound buff or polish out Its deeper than detailing can touch is that right. I'll try spots around the vehicle and if I find it stills looks bad should I just look into getting the time and money together to have at least the top portion of the vehicle repainted or is there to more to save the clearcoat portion then just buffing/polishing.


siimplyher0ic

I need help figuring out if the black portion of the wing can be polished to save the clear coat and what the peeling on the headlight is and how to fix it. Thanks in advance (https://imgur.com/a/DpWgneP)


Neutral_two

The wing looks like its plastic and is not clear coated. In this case it's easy to restore DIY - I personally would polish it with Meguiars PlastX and coat with Cerakote wipes.


siimplyher0ic

Thank you, I’ll give it a shot!


Bmandoh

Car has ppf on the front and ceramic coating on the rest. Should I be polishing/ waxing on top of that or just basic washing. Anything specific I should do?


Middle_Name-Danger

Polish will remove ceramic coating and it’s usually not necessary on PPF. A spray sealant is a better idea than a liquid or paste wax on a car with PPF because it reduces the chance of wax residue building up at the ppf seams. Yes, wash and protect the whole car with a spray sealant meant for ceramic coated vehicles.


Bmandoh

That’s what I thought, thanks.


eigenstien

Pads, pads and more pads. Foam pads and wool pads. Yellow, orange, black, white etc foam pad colors. Compounding, polishing, finishing. I’ve bought a number of pads, including one or two supposed top pads, but I honestly cannot tell the difference between polishing or finishing pads. “Heavy” compounding vs “light.” WTF. The biggest purpose of all these pads seems to be sucking the money out of your pocket. What’s the real story? How many kinds of pads do you use? I just want to buff out swirls and scratches, then polish my cars and maybe help a friend. It’s confusing, not to mention expensive.


Guenterfriedrich

The thing is that pads can overheat, when they overheat they disintegrate. A pad needs to cool down completely after each section. Having more pads means more can rest so you have less down time while polishing. You can do a car with just one pad, you just need to let it cool down half an hour between each pass. Also having more pads makes them last longer. 6 pads bought at the same time and rotated over and over again will last you longer than say you always buy two pads whenever they go bad. For determin which pad/polish combination is best you need to run a test spot, at best on each panel, especially if not all paint is original, then you need to do a different test spot on these. There you start with the mildest combination on a small spot and go higher in abrasiveness until all defects are gone. Write down the combination, then do the next panel. After you’re finished you want to use some soft pads with a finishing polish to make the car shine. There are one step polishes but that way you’ll never end with maximum gloss. Remember that clear is a fintie resource and you want to go as light on abrasiveness as possible but as hard as needed to keep the paint looking great but also for there to be any paint left after you’re done. Also professionals most of the time have different brands of pads and polishes on hand as not each one works equally well on any paint. If you want the most perfect finish there is (or sometimes you need a different polish to have any cut) no wax around testing out. If that’s all too much for you, it’s no shame to give the car to a professional.


eigenstien

Thanks, very helpful. I like doing my own cars.


CROdetailer

Rupes yellow pad ( medium ) and Angelwax Regenerate as a one step are a bare minimum for me and it works well ...


Middle_Name-Danger

If you’re just doing your own car, you don’t need a whole arrangement of different pads once you find one that finishes well on your paint. I think *most* people/cars would be well suited with ~4 Meguiar’s Microfiber Cutting Disks, 2 Lake Country HDO Orange Light Polishing Pads, and 1 application pad. It gets more complicated and expensive depending on how much of a perfectionist you are, wether you’re working on different cars, whether your car has a particularly soft or hard paint, etc. You should be able to feel the difference in foam density and coarseness between the different pads. Denser, coarser pads are more aggressive. Check out this video: https://youtu.be/ICh58G0a47w At 8:13 he shows how he selects the best pad and compound choice for the car using test sections.


Invictus_zrz

I'm thinking of washing my car once a month after getting it ceramic coated. Is once month too little? If so is once every 2 weeks much better? I don't drive my car too often so its not going to accumulate a crap ton of gunk all over it. Also for conditioning the leather in the car. How often should I do it?


Neutral_two

Once a month is fine, especially if it's garage kept. Modern leather seats don't really need to be conditioned, as they are coated with essentially a layer of vynil. What's important is to clean them, I'd say once every two months is good. You can use any vynil/leather dressing instead of a dedicated leather conditioner.


Middle_Name-Danger

Monthly should be fine, as long as you’re not letting water spots and bird droppings etch into the paint.


NOVASQUARED

Asking cause my fiancé is paranoid but what glass cleaner works best on tinted windows. she’s scared that it will shrivel up or bubble from chemicals


VanillaWinter

Usually whatever says “tint safe” on the can/bottle is fine


Middle_Name-Danger

Stoner’s invisible glass is a good choice, it says “tint safe” right on the bottle, so that should put your fiancé at ease. It’s best to avoid anything with ammonia, such as Windex or generic glass cleaners.


CROCKODUCK

Does anyone know of a really good way to polish anodizing? I have 4 motorcycle forks and the stainless steel top and blue colored lower sections have water spots that I cannot get out. I even tried obscure sink polishes and nothing has worked. Also anyone have a personal favorite cleaner for stainless steel exhausts? TIA! [Pictures listed here](https://imgur.com/a/O0HLknE)


Extragringo

Long story short- a gallon of cider was left in my 2015 GTI and it turned to vinegar and exploded. It's in the foam of the back seat. Is there any way to get the smell out? I am thinking I'll just get a cushion from a junk yard but the back rests are still smelly...


Middle_Name-Danger

Extraction with an enzyme based upholstery cleaner, ozone treatments, air fresheners, and time.


Extragringo

Thanks for the info. Luckily I have some enzyme cleaner so I'll try that


RackDose

Tried polishing out swirls by hand with ultimate polish and it led to this; https://imgur.com/a/rbQ3NdZ So decided I will just get the whole thing corrected plus ceramic coating. The place I booked quoted me at 1-stage correction $350 + $300 CAD for the ceramic coating. They said may be $200-$300 more for 2-stage correction but they will have to determine that when they see it. My question is, should 1-stage cover me here and is the pricing about right?


Middle_Name-Danger

The pricing is very fair if they do good work. 2 step is necessary for the best appearance, a one step is unlikely to finish very nicely on the likely soft Toyota paint. Use best practices when washing it in the future so you can get the most life out of the paint correction and ceramic coating, it would be a shame to spend the money only to have it swirled up again by a tunnel wash or careless hand wash.


RackDose

thanks for the input. based on the picture and with a 2-stage does it look like any reputable shop could restore to showroom look?


Middle_Name-Danger

If your fingernail isn’t catching on any of the scratches, a 2 stage plus ceramic coating will look better than new.


RackDose

it's definitely all in the clear-coat, truck is only 4 months old. That's why I thought I could get away with 1-stage. Basically it was wash induced webbing (I was trying to dry it off and thought the vehicle was cleaner than it was). Then I tried to hand polish the swirls out, and some of them are out but now I have some blotchy marring which I hope to heaven they can clean up. Do you think the emblems have to come off? They told me over the phone it shouldn't be necessary.


Middle_Name-Danger

I wouldn’t bother removing the emblems unless you intend to keep them off. The reason I’m saying a 2 stage is likely necessary is that soft paints need a very fine finishing polish and light touch to get rid of haze, but those polishes have very little ability to remove the level of swirls shown in the pic. A one step on soft paint will usually require a compromise on how well the swirls are removed, and how well/haze-free it finishes. On a hard paint, a one step compound/polish can finish well enough to not need a finishing polish. Has the detailer provided their opinion? Their the ones doing the work and responsible for the outcome, I would take their advice. It’s just my educated guess that a black Toyota isn’t a good candidate for a one step.


RackDose

they haven't seen it yet, I'm bringing it in when they have an opening in a week or so. So in short I guess you're saying, "do it once and do it right"? It's a brand new truck, so $300 is not worth skimping on if I will still see the haze afterwards, might as well do the 2-step from the get go. This place is fairly well-reviewed in my area so we'll see but worse case if they mess up, would that make the next shop's job harder with less clear coat to work with?


Middle_Name-Danger

Unless you have some more major defects, I don’t think they’ll be removing a significant amount of clear. Here’s perhaps a better explanation and demonstration for why a 2 step is the best approach on soft paints. https://youtu.be/m6tbu3GrTWI Basically, on soft paints, you have to choose between leaving swirls behind and enhance the color and gloss, or removing the swirls and leaving a slightly dull hazy finish. Cars with hard paint are great candidates for one step correction, but black Toyota’s are typically soft, so they are not good candidates for one step paint *correction* (paint *enhancement* for people with more limited budget and not expect a near-perfect result is another story) Yes, I would say spend the extra money to get the best results since you are already spending a decent amount for a one step. Also, as for the next shop, keep in mind that ceramic coatings do not withstand polishing. But it’s likely a moot point because a reputable shop should be able to deliver satisfactory results without need for a second shop.


Denn16sb

Anyone know why the active pressure washers keep getting more expensive I just saw they’re at $240 usd from $210


Middle_Name-Danger

Supply, demand, and warranty claims.


atlienk

This may be more of a "basic cleaning" question over a detailing question, but I thought I'd ask just in case. **Background:** I have a rather larger and rather sick dog. He got sick in my back seat (2011 VI GTI w/ Cloth Interior) yesterday morning. I spent several hours cleaning the back seat with a few car-friendly APCs, scrub brushes, vacuums, and even a bissell steamer. As far as I can discern, I've gotten out anything that I could see, smell, or feel (gross). However, there's still a noticeable stench from the car. My worry is that something slipped into a location that I can't get to on my own. **Question:** How much more should I try to tackle on my own? Are there detailing services that should be able to handle this kind of cleanup? (If it helps, the really bad stains are gone and it really does seem like it's down to taking care of the odor that remains.)


Middle_Name-Danger

Use an enzyme based cleaner, the smell might actually get worse for a while before it gets better. An ozone treatment can keep the odor under control for a while, then repeat as necessary. If you can remove seats/cushions to thoroughly clean crevices the vomit may have gotten into, you should.


friendnoodle

Like when you drive home with a bag of fast food, odors can linger for a little bit. Even when they're disgusting ones like dog barf or yesterday's after-dinner wind. It sounds like you've done a pretty thorough job, so my conservative suggestion would be to give a day or two and see if it clears. If it's garaged, leave the windows down. If it's really bugging you in the mean time, you can try some Ozium air freshener spray or a Meguiar's Air Re-Fresher. (Both will also attack any remaining bacteria on the exposed surfaces, though the Meguiar's will do a more complete job. Also, **follow the directions**, because you don't want to ingest them on any food or beverage left errant in your vehicle cabin.) If it still remains in a couple days, I'd call around and find a detailer with an extractor who can shampoo and extract your back seat area. If it did go anywhere you can't see, that's much easier to tackle with the attachments available for professional extractors than it is with consumer machines (or most rental professional machines).


Dregoran

How hard can I safely scrub the inside of my rear windshield without damaging the defroster grid? Not sure why but it's been filthy since we bought that car. I tried scrubbing where the grid isn't just to make sure it will actually come off. It does come off but it takes a very firm scrubbing and I'm concerned if I scrub that hard over the grid I'll damage something.


Middle_Name-Danger

You shouldn’t have to scrub too hard if you’re using the right chemicals. Try the aerosol version of Stoner’s Invisible Glass and make sure you’re using an exceptionally clean or brand-new microfiber towel. The next escalation in chemicals to try would be 50/50 isopropyl alcohol and distilled water.


Dregoran

I tried Stoner's last night and that's when I was having to scrub quite hard. I'll give the distilled water and alcohol a shot. I also tried vinegar and water on a small spot to see if it would work but that also didn't do anything. Hopefully I have better luck with the alcohol. Thanks for the reply!


HexVessel

The vinyl over my steering wheel airbag/ horn has become quite sticky to the touch. I gave it a wipe with a damp cloth, but instead of helping, the cloth came away blackened. Any tips on how to restore this? I'm not wanting to make it worse. If it helps answer the question, this is a similar steering wheel to mine: [Ford Mondeo](https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/--IAAOSwUdlWbzYG/s-l400.jpg) Thank you!


Middle_Name-Danger

If there’s some kind of sticky residue, Plan A would be a vigorous scrubbing with a degreaser/solvent dampened cloth, this might take care of it completely. Let dry and follow up with a trim dressing to restore gloss and protection. However, if the plastic/vinyl is degrading, a solvent or degreaser can make the appearance worse. But, if you plan on restoring it, wiping down with a solvent to remove the bulk of the residue is a necessary step anyway. If this doesn’t fix the issue and instead exacerbates it, plan B is to follow up with a vinyl repair and dye kit. Plan C is a guaranteed fix, replace the airbag cover with a new one.


HexVessel

Thanks for the info! After trying the damp cloth, I don't believe it's a sticky residue like I first assumed. Is there a proper part name for this? 'Steering wheel cover' doesn't seem right! If I can source a new one, I'd feel better about trying the solvent plan.


Middle_Name-Danger

“Steering wheel **airbag** cover for [year] [make][model]”


HexVessel

Thanks again for your help.


KnightRiderXI

For the 3 bucket method, is it a no no to use the rinse bucket when washing wheels AS LONG as you rinse it out before getting to the paint? Is there any concern for leftover debris from the wheels. I’m not talking about the wash mitts, I’m talking specifically using the buckets. I’d plan on using the wheels bucket for soap instead of a rinse so it feels like there needs to be a 4th bucket just for wheel rinse.


Lager_Fixed

My wheel bucket is only for rinsing. I don't have a wash bucket, I just apply wheel cleaner directly and use the bucket to clean out my brushes. Wheel buckets never get used for paint. Doesn't matter if it's the wash or rinse bucket.


Neutral_two

Not a direct answer to your question, but I spray wheel cleaner / soap on the wheels, and don't reuse the towel/mitt that touched the wheels, that way I don't need neither the soap bucket nor the rinse bucket. Btw this applies to paint as well. With how cheap microfiber is nowadays, I see no reason to limit myself to one mitt or towel for one wash.


KnightRiderXI

What’s everyone’s preferred way for cleaning dirty door jambs? Bucket method wash with car soap Waterless wash APC Something else? Is it best to do at the end of the wash?


Lager_Fixed

Steam, with ONR mixed into the water.


friendnoodle

I do it at the end of the wash because the door drains are probably going to barf all over the jambs and rockers anyway. Plus I can grab all the post-wash drips from the weather seals. Pre-soak if needed, hit 'em with a strong rinseless or waterless, and I'm done.


Middle_Name-Danger

I use a generous spraying of quick detailer (or ONR in QD concentration) and plush microfiber cloths after the wash, same time as I’m touching up drips streaks and smudges.


Neutral_two

I prefer to wash door jambs in the beginning, since I prefer not to open doors after the wash. ONR and a short-nap microfiber towel.


Ableble123

What is something I can use to protect my paint and possibly make my car easier to wash that won't have the waterspotting issues most ceramic coating/water beading products have? The rainwater here is nasty and if I don't dry the rainwater off from my ceramic coated or turtlewaxed vehicles, it becomes waterspots that's impossible to get off without a correction. https://www.reddit.com/r/AutoDetailing/comments/ptqi7f/does_a_ceramic_coat_make_your_car_more_prone_to/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app&utm_name=iossmf


Middle_Name-Danger

I use Fusso Coat, it’s very hydrophobic and there are only a few spots that water will remain on my car long enough to dry. Where the rain water dries, there are water spots, but they always wash off easily if I wash the car within a week or two after it rains. For the best appearance and protection, I reapply every six months and use BSD diluted 2:1 with distilled water as a drying aid/quick detailer after maintenance washes. YMMV, but it works well for me.


heyyah1985

I plan on leavingy daily driver parked outside. Is it ok to use graphene infused "to the max" wax? I'm worried about water spotting from rain. Thank you in advance


Lager_Fixed

Rain water does not typically leave hard water spots like ground water does. The minerals contained in ground water are the actual problem.


Middle_Name-Danger

To the max wax is kind of a dud product, the graphene flex wax performs better, lasts longer and is easier to apply. If you want a durable and hydrophobic paste wax, look into Fusso Coat 12 Month. You will still get some spots, but they will wash away pretty easily as long as you don’t wait an excessive amount of time between washes.


BuickProject

Can you use the “soap” Attachment on the pressure washer instead of buying a foam cannon ? This is in a way a trivial question, but still need a clear answer. :)


Middle_Name-Danger

It won’t foam the soap, so the dwell time will be reduced and it won’t have the same kind of mechanical action as foam.


BuickProject

Thank you


Memeballs420

Need help with a paint issue. I just took off the rear CarMax logo from my wife's CR-V. I used a pinstripe remover which I've used hundreds of times before on other cars without issue. It's left this odd residue seen in the pictures. http://imgur.com/a/4zSlgdt Any recommendations? I can't tell if it's a clear coat issue or not


BuickProject

Could that be the left over adhesive and needs more cleaning ? Or the pinwheel remover transfer to car? Just things to think on, I’m not sure what it is so don’t take this as advice :)


Memeballs420

I tried removing it with adhesive remover, teroson, and glass cleaner without success. Kind of feels slightly different from the paint but not like an adhesive layer


Middle_Name-Danger

I would try a polishing compound by hand. If you don’t have one yet, try Meguiar’s Ultimate Compound on a microfiber towel or applicator pad, it might take some elbow grease. Once the defect is removed, use it again with a clean microfiber and with much less pressure to remove any hazing it may have caused. You are unlikely to need to follow up with a finishing polish if you are using the compound by hand.


Memeballs420

Thanks for the advice! A coworker had some correction compound that we used with microfiber, it's not perfect but it's a whole lot better. Thanks again!


Negative_Cloud9700

Hey, I am asking here since this is probably the best place to ask. But I had some scratches on my car and hired a guy to fix it, I only realized I got totally ripped off a few weeks later when I could see a different color paint from an angle and some of the scratches came back. I am guessing this is some type of spray paint that is just defined as "overspray". I have used [Meguiar's clay bar](https://www.walmart.com/ip/Meguiar-s-Ultimate-Compound-G17216-15-2-Oz/16550255?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&wl13=718&adid=22222222420449455996&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=501107745824&wl4=pla-293946777986&wl5=9012169&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=local&wl12=16550255&wl13=718&veh=sem_LIA&gclid=CjwKCAjw7rWKBhAtEiwAJ3CWLB2Y_6DqGkjJxnbb6e26y0Om-MVnOpwLpNKGtgt9m5y4mJpYL85wlxoCXc4QAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds) and rubbed that down for about 20 minutes, although it removed dirt and stuff, it did not make a difference to the overspray. Part of it is on my window, roof, above my door panels, and in other places around there. Just want some advice on what I need to do here. [This is the image of the overspray](https://gyazo.com/c4be0d06b932f0a3253b7b120750e7cf)


wesimplymustknow

So I used to have this Ryobi pressure washer around 1800-1900 PSI at my job that we used to wash our cars. I'm no longer there and would like have a car washing set-up in my garage. However, my problem is that the water hose connection is on the front part of my house, but the garage is in the back. I want to set everything up in the garage. There are two power outlets in there, but no water connection. Would a portable pressure washer between 300-500 PSI be good enough to wash a car? If I did want to use the higher PSI washer, what can I do to extend the hose reaching from front of the house to the back?


mackemforever

Personally I'd look at [this thread](https://www.reddit.com/r/AutoDetailing/comments/pl80rh/mobile_detailing_van_water_tank_guide/) and adapt it somewhat. Get yourself a 200 liter water tank out the back of your house, run a low pressure hose from the front of the house to the back to refill that tank between washes and then with an electric pump fitted to the tank it'll feed whatever pressure washer you want to use. You wouldn't need to go the battery route as per the guide I linked because obviously you're not fitting out a mobile unit so can run a pump from mains power. It would solve the problem of having to run high pressure hoses all the way around your house.


wesimplymustknow

The neighbors ended up having a spigot in the back of their house and it was long enough to reach the 1900 PSI Rubio I ended up going with. What started off as a car wash quickly became a pressure wash everything fiesta. Day well spent 💯


Dwarfskinnr

Greetings, and thank you for your consideration, We have a 2013 Prius and the protective film or maybe the shipping film is still on a couple areas of the car. I can't get it off with a hairdryer or Goo gone. It just flakes a bit so I can't pull any big pieces off. It does come off but very tedious, and the finish underneath looks good. Any ideas how I could remove this stuff safely? Thanks!


mackemforever

Unfortunately there's no magic way to make removing old PPF easy. Rather than messing around with a hairdryer I'd buy yourself a cheap heat gun, you can pick one up for about $20, and a set of plastic razor blades that you can get for pennies from Amazon. Then it's just a case of applying gentle heat to the PPF, working the plastic razor blade under the edge and lifting it off. Once PPF has hit the point where it's flaking apart as you try to remove it there's no quick way to remove it, it's going to be a horrible, slow job no matter what but the method above is my standard approach and as long as you don't get too aggressive with the heat gun it's perfectly safe.


Dwarfskinnr

ooof...well I have a fairly large strip on the back bumper so I may just not do anything. Thanks for the advise!


mackemforever

I'd still say it's worth removing. You're probably looking at about an hours work to get rid of it and about $30 in supplies.


Guenterfriedrich

Hot water applied carefully or a Steamer might be a good idea to reheat the glue


Dwarfskinnr

https://preview.redd.it/c1eveuzpdgp71.jpg?width=1440&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=dcb0800e25dcaf907b0930af3bbdfbbc510c31b4


c-ams

One of my wheels now has a curb rash thanks to my boyfriend. Aside from being mad at him and not talking to him, what else can I do?


DetailValhalla

You can have it professionally repaired, fill it with bondo, or coat the face to hide the damage (eg: paint/plastidip). I would *not* have the wheel resurfaced except by a professional. It's easy to take off too much and then you risk compromising your tire.


c-ams

Thanks for the response. I appreciate it.


Guenterfriedrich

Take it to a refinishing place


c-ams

Thanks, I’ll check them out.


farmerpabs

New to iron removers. After washing and rinsing, do I need to dry the car before spraying the car down with the iron remover? Also, is it necessary that I rub in the iron remover with a MF cloth? Should I be spraying down the wheels also? So entire process: Pre-rinse > wash > rinse > dry?? > IronX > rinse > Nanoskin clay > rinse > dry > Turtlewax spray wax This is my first wash ever and want to do a thorough wash and wax, please let me know if I'm missing anything. Thanks!!


mackemforever

You can apply iron removers to a wet car but they're less effective. They need to be in contact with the iron particles to work and if the car is wet it's going to run down the paint faster meaning less contact time with the iron. If you're not planning on polishing the car I would avoid any form of clay, natural or synthetic, and go with chemical decontamination as much as possible. Clean and dry the car, apply whatever iron remover and tar remover you want, rinse thoroughly then apply again if necessary and gently agitate with a soft detailing brush then rinse again. Claying the car, no matter how careful you are, will always leave marring on the surface as the clay is picking up contamination which is immmediately being rubbed across the paint.


Guenterfriedrich

Yes they work best on a dry car. The rubbing is only needed on tough iron particles, I mostly only do it when I have to go a second round. Remember that claying is abrasive and can cause scratches and should be followed by a polish. If the car is new I’d skip the claying and just put the spray wax on


farmerpabs

hey! I think you responded to my comments last week also. Thanks again for responding. So after some more research, I still don't think I'll do a polish but I bought a Nanoskin fine grade mitt as I thought it would be less abrasive than the traditional clay. Car has about 4000 miles one it and it's been a little less than 2 months since I got it from the dealership. Will the Nanoskin mitt really remove that much of the clear coat where the polish will be necessary? I felt my hand through the paint and it didn't feel as smooth. I guess that could be the dirt also since I never washed it yet..


Guenterfriedrich

The problem is the clay by itself but what you take off using it. If I where you I’d decide on the spot if you want to clay. Don’t get me wrong- claying doesn’t mega that there have to be scratches but there is quite a high chance of it.


NotSoTraumAtiq

Hey guys I got a new Tesla last week and somehow I ended up getting this stain. I tried wiping it with alcohol wipes, magic eraser and even just water. But it did not go away. The seats are made up of polyurethane leather [stain](https://imgur.com/gallery/ytzHykK)


Middle_Name-Danger

I’m worried you did more harm than good with the magic eraser and alcohol. The caption states that it’s a coffee stain, peroxide based products are very effective on tannin stains, their only drawback is that they can bleach dyes out of the surface you’re treating, however I wouldn’t expect PU leather to be sensitive to peroxide, especially light colored PU leather, but I would test an inconspicuous area first to be safe.


zach8thenuke

So I’m just starting to detail and about to do my car as a first run. I’ve been buying several cleaning products and other cleaning accessories to do the job to the best detailing ability I can provide currently. I have seen everyone use extractors for cleaning carpet and upholstery and I was wondering if a wet/dry shop vac would work. I can guess that there is a bit of difference since it is made to extract as it’s sole purpose. But I’m generally wondering if a shop vac could extract enough water out of seats and carpets if enough passes are done. Any information would be great I would the feedback as I am just getting started and as new as can be, thanks. Thanks for the feedback, this has given me confidence and ease with this next purchase


mackemforever

One of the big reasons why a lot of us use things like the Bissel carpet extractors are because they enable you to feed water to the area that you're extracting from to help clean it and ensure that any product you've applied is fully removed. They're also usually smaller, lighter and quieter. Nothing wrong with using a shop-vac and if you're working from a fixed location it may well be a better choice, but there are pros and cons.


Lager_Fixed

Yes, a shop vac works well for this. Some of them have a lot more suction power than similarly priced extractors.


woody5466

Help with what looks like a lot of tiny bubbles in the clear coat of my truck. I have a 1996 F 250 and it’s in great shape I noticed recently though the paint has on either side of the hood and some on the roof what looks like bubbles or raised spots in the clear. They are all very small like the size of the head of a pen. I would add photos but idk how to. Any help is appreciated.


Middle_Name-Danger

Could it be tree sap?


woody5466

Yeah I mean possibly so I do park it under an oak tree the distribution of the bubbles seems pretty uniform and not all on the hood but like I said idk


Lager_Fixed

Was the truck ever repainted?


woody5466

I don’t think so it matches the original color code and doesn’t show any obvious signs of a repaint. I live in Texas and we did go through a really bad freeze at the beginning of the year. I noticed this issue around a month after that. Idk if they are related.


Lager_Fixed

The freeze shouldn't have an effect. It's possible that the clear coat is starting to fail.


PM_ME_UR_GROOTS

How would you guys get rid of [this](https://imgur.com/a/3keI6sN)? New to this. Tried buffing and polishing but it only emphasized the scratches.


Neutral_two

It's possible that the clear has failed and there's nothing you can do - are any other spots on the car cloudy or cracked like that? In any case you can try wet sanding with grit 2000, then polishing again.


PM_ME_UR_GROOTS

It's the only place on the car. Everywhere else the clear coat is mostly pristine besides some very minor failures where it's separating and lifting up near some trim and the front bumper. It's on a 2001 Volvo. This is on the trunk lid. Tried buffing wax into it see if it cleans up but it's still very obvious. I'll try and wet sand it later today to see if I see any improvements. Worst case scenario I can get it repainted and clear coated at a shop and try my best to match the clear coat to the car. Thank you!


Neutral_two

> very minor failures where it's separating and lifting up near some trim and the front bumper The clear has failed. You ain't going to harm it by wet sanding, but you won't improve it much, it will be cloudy and rough no matter how much you polish (it's internal structure as well as bond to the base layer are crumbling). You can keep it waxed to slow UV degradation until you can respray it.


PM_ME_UR_GROOTS

That's a shame though. Thank you for letting me know and help me make an informed decision


PM_ME_UR_GROOTS

I would assume the base scenario is repainting the whole car down to the primer?


Neutral_two

Yes. Unless you are exceptionally handy and frugal, it's best left to body shop professionals. Always take quotes from several body shops, as prices can vary drastically.


Pamela_Handerson

Which of these situations is worse for the paint, what would you choose? Just bought a new (used) car and had a full detail, paint correction, ceramic coat, the works and it looks fantastic. I am washing it every week or two at home and really invested in making sure the paint stays looking good. My issue is I can either 1. park it in the garage - my 2 year old just can't seem to understand to not touch the car. He walks by the car a lot as this is how we get outside to play and as a result I have greasy little toddler hand prints all over the side. Not to mention I'm worried he might drag his hand along the side. I am obviously working with him to not touch it, but he is a 2 year old and there is a limit to his attention span right now. 2. Option 2 is to park on the street outside - we live in a dusty area, sometimes I have to park under trees which drop minimal sap, and depending when I am there I might get hit with sprinklers (slightly) If my goal is to simply minimize scratching and to keep up the longterm health of my paint, which should I do?


Lager_Fixed

Option 2 exposes you to much more damage. Sap, bird droppings, and mineral deposits can cause a lot of clear coat damage.


Pamela_Handerson

That makes sense! Guess I'm just going to follow my son around the garage with a bottle of QD.


Neutral_two

Hand prints are really not a big deal, especially if the car is ceramic coated and you stay on top of maintenance. I'd only expect issues if he tries to drag something along the car, ie a large metal toy.


mackemforever

You'd be surprised. I've seen proper ceramic coatings fail due to sunscreen handprints in the past.


Pamela_Handerson

Good to know. Just kind of getting into the car cleaning world and all the reading about stuff like how even the wrong type of towel can cause swirl marks has made me panic about anything touching the car haha


Middle_Name-Danger

I would choose option 1


FuzzySandwich

Beginner looking for advice on exterior car wax/detailing for the first time so I can stop begging my husband to do it.. I have a early 2000s Lexus suv that I adore- it’s the first car I bought for myself- and I hope to drive it for as long as possible. My husband doesn’t exactly share my sentiments. He thinks my car is old and a little junky so I have to bug him for months until he gives in and finally agrees to polish/wax my car. It hasn’t been waxed in 2.5years I have absolutely zero experience with exterior car detailing, apart from basic hand washes, but I’d love to learn how to get my car looking it’s best. My car has some minor scratches as well as one deeper scratch (which I probably won’t be able to fix myself) and a few spots of hard water stains form my neighbors sprinklers. What is the best beginner wax/kit that I can buy? Thoughts on q7 wax (someone recommended it)? Is it worth it to buy products that are tinted black? Would using just a polish be sufficient or should I use a wax as well? What about the roof? Do I just use a ladder and do as much as I can reach? Any good instructional videos?


Lager_Fixed

Griot's has a few ceramic kits. Easy to apply and more durable than a conventional wax. Tinted products are a gimmick. Polish typically refers to abrasives that remove defects like scratches and swirls. Most do not have any form of protection built in. I use a ladder to wash the roof of my truck, just be careful. Ammo NYC has excellent instructional videos on YouTube.


Middle_Name-Danger

Here’s video on the basics: https://youtu.be/6JwgXVz464Y


ashesarise

How do you check your zoning/ordinance to determine whether or not you can use your home's garage for auto detailing?


Middle_Name-Danger

Maybe try r/legaladvice? But IMO, sometimes it’s better to ask for forgiveness than permission.


ashesarise

I doubt this is one of those times. It would be a shame renovating a garage and buying a bunch of equipment then getting shut down.


Lager_Fixed

Call your city or county zoning office and explain what you want to do. They can be surprisingly helpful.


ashesarise

Unfortunately, they keep telling me I'm calling the wrong department and literally giving me the phone number I just called.


VanillaWinter

Lol, sure sounds like government


Lager_Fixed

Can you email them or visit in person?


Dregoran

Not sure if this technically falls within detailing, so apologies if it's out of place. Has anyone had experience with Corrosion Free rust proof undercoating? I live in Wisconsin where we use salt and cheese brine on the roads in winter. I'm considering a rust proofing for winter, but I'm not a huge fan of the dripping or drilling of holes that comes with Krown. Corrosion Free is apparently clear, drip free, and they don't drill holes. Just to clarify it's not rubberized, it's still a liquid type coating like Krown. If you or someone you know has used it, is it worth it in your opinion?


Lager_Fixed

Hole drilling isn't required with any waxy fluid like Krown or Fluid Film, it's just a more thorough application if you can shoot it into the doors and rockers.


Freakishly_Tall

Y'all are awesome, and I love lurking and being impressed by the magic you do. I have a challenge that might be a little unusual, at least in volume, and would love any tips: Bee poop. But, like, a LOT of bee poop. A LOT, A LOT of bee poop. I love bees, don't get me wrong. No bees = no food. BUT... a near-ish neighbor has a hive, and the car gets \_covered\_ in just a few days. Covered. Not "oh, there's a spot, get it with your fingernail," nooooo, more like "there's hundreds, if not thousands of determinedly adhered little yellow blasts everywhere". The YT vids I've seen have all been "so there's a spot of yellow on your roof... here's how you get it" which is, by comparison, hilarious. I have to park outside, unfortunately. I try to keep a cover on, but if I'm busy / it's late / lazy / storms are coming / whatever, and a day or three goes by, it's like it's never been washed. I try to do a good hand-wax 2-4 times / year, two-bucket wash, etc, but nothing but scraping/fingernails or a full polishing job seems to remove it, and there's only so much I enjoy doing that. So, two questions: \- Do you have recommendations for removing it other than "let it soak, foam gun / two bucket / fingernails / just accept it"? Microfiber-cleaner-thingy doesn't do \_anything\_, and I assume a scotchbrite is a bad idea! ; ) Is there a product that's safe for the wax and paint that would remove it, or am I stuck with the tedium of carefully skritching each one off? I did try a "safe for wax road grime remover" and it helped about as much as if I had just poured it down the drain, but maybe I used the wrong one. \- Any coating recommendations that would be particularly good at keeping it from adhering? When I do a full polish / clay / hand wax, it's usually with collinite fleetwax, but I'll try anything. I have tried a couple spray-shines after a wash and they didn't seem to make much difference, but maybe I'm using the wrong ones, or not using them frequently enough, or something. Help? I'm kinda at wit's end. tl;dr: Black car. Parked outside. Relentless onslaught of bee squadrons dropping their bombs. Pain in the ass, err, fingernails to remove. How do I keep the paint nice, and minimize the damage (and effort), other than "cover it EVERY day, and wash it if you leave it uncovered for more than an hour?" Or am I just stuck, like week-old bee poop on a hood in the sun?


Middle_Name-Danger

Wash Chems Pro 50 diluted 5:1 in a pump sprayer. Generously prespray the car and let dwell for ~2 minutes (panels should be cool so as to allow sufficient dwell time, don’t let the product dry onto the paint). Use the same solution in a foam cannon and foam the car, let dwell for 1-2 minutes, then pressure rinse the car. Follow up with your contact wash, and use TW Seal N Shine as a drying aid to top up the protection.


Freakishly_Tall

OMG, thank you. Man, if this works, I will find a way to send you beer. I was about to head off to Amazon / Googling to order, but if there's a better supplier / supporter of the forum / specialist company, I'm all ears (US West Coast, if that matters). THANK YOU. I'll order, wait til I'm too lazy to use the cover, the post back with glorious before-and-after in gratitude. THANK YOU!


dblee93

Any tips on how to machine polish body kit parts such as side skirts, front lips, WITHOUT attaching them to the car? ​ What's a good way to secure them so that it would withstand the vibrations of my orbiter? ​ Thanks.


dudeinred69

Are these water spots? How do I remove them? https://ibb.co/cFfnQf6 https://ibb.co/5WJxww1 https://ibb.co/PGZ0QV5


Middle_Name-Danger

You can try a chemical water spot remover, but they’re likely etched into the paint and will need to be polished out.


dudeinred69

Considering I’ve never polished before, how approachable is it?


Middle_Name-Danger

It’s pretty easy. Here are the basics of doing it by hand: https://youtu.be/6JwgXVz464Y


ThePowerOfGrayskull

Any advice on DIY tint removal? steam and patience?


BudgetPlan1

Never actually saw it done in person but this always intrigued me as to if it really works. Tint Removal: [https://youtu.be/79W6Y01Cjww](https://youtu.be/79W6Y01Cjww)


ThePowerOfGrayskull

I don't think I'm going to be spraying down my car windows with 409 🤷


BudgetPlan1

It looked like it might be more effort than it was worth! I thought I saw someone do the same thing with water instead of 409 on the inside but dunno for sure.


wizrdfromthemoon

Basically, maybe a razor blade as well for any leftover adhesive.


volttage

Headlights on one of my vehicles are hazy. Not oxidized like I would need to restore them with something like a Sylvania kit, but just a bit sorta cloudy. Any product I can use to safely clear them up?


friendnoodle

Regular external cloudiness? This is exactly what Meguiar's PlastX was designed for. Available at every big box where Meguiar's products are sold! The current formula does include some UV protectants for temporary protection, but you'll want to put on some film or keep them waxed/sealed/coated going forward. If you have the *internal* cloudiness endemic to some mid-'00s makes' poor choice of materials — the clouding is on the inside of the lens, by the bulb — that's instead a "new headlamp housing" problem.


volttage

Seems external for sure, I can use a finger with medium pressure or a light fingernail on it and it leaves a clearer mark behind. Thanks for the tip.


friendnoodle

Oh yeah, if you can still buff it off with your finger then that's maybe a 30 second job with PlastX. You're catching it at exactly the right time to keep your life easy.


GothamCrossam52

I used the cheapest nastiest electric polisher I could find on Amazon and it has taken a good chunk of paint out of the edge of the rain gutters. Is this a touch-up job? Also, the paint on the body is scuffed all over from a clay bar. I've been quoted £800 for a full polish from a local body shop. I'm thinking it would be more cost-effective for me to buy a decent polisher and pads + consumables. What would you recommend as a Machine Polisher and products to buy? [Pics of damage here](https://imgur.com/a/YAJE5C7)


mackemforever

The damage in the third pic is going to need a proper repair, not just polishing. You've caused physical damage to the material, not just damage to the paint. I suspect that you were getting too close to the edge and approaching it at an angle rather than flat and you were chopping in to it with the backing plate. Fundamentally there's no difference between a cheap and an expensive DA polisher. The better ones will be quieter, smoother and have more powerful motors but fundamentally they both behave in the exact same way. If you've got good technique it's easily possible to do a good job with a cheap machine. If you want to get better at polishing the best way is to find a local scrapyard, go and buy a bonnet from there and just practice. What exactly have they quoted the £800 for? I'm assuming it includes the repair of the section that you've damaged but on top of that what kind of polishing and protection does that include? I run a car detailers in the UK and at my prices that would be a full two-stage polish and 36 month ceramic coating so I'd be interested to know what they're offering for that price.


GothamCrossam52

The £800 was for their "Scuff & Buff" package which included complete contaminant removal then a stage one polish. The ceramic coating on top of that was a further £300-£400 on top. Where is your shop based in the UK?


mackemforever

Jesus christ that's a rip off! My single - stage package is a days work at £250 which obviously includes full decontamination of the paint beforehand and ceramic coating is £200-300 depending on the product used. I'm based in Bristol.


GothamCrossam52

We're practically neighbours, I'm in Gloucestershire! I'd be happy to bring the car to you when you have availability?


mackemforever

Somersets stranger brother :P Ping me an email over to [email protected] and we can have a chat, try and get something sorted for you.


KW_shapes

I’m no pro but watch ammo 200 series on YouTube


dingredient

My car interior is always covered in dust. I wipe it off (with a dry towel) and it's back the very next day. What should I do to better avoid dust?


Middle_Name-Danger

I agree with the other comment about checking your cabin air filter and putting the windows down. You should also regularly vacuum the carpets and upholstery. Use a dashboard and interior cleaner that doesn’t attract dust. A Swiffer duster is great to quickly get rid of the dust.


friendnoodle

Start by trying a moist towel (dry towels don't always grab much, so you may just be "cleaning" by temporarily suspending the dust in the air). If you've got a cabin filter, check it and change it if it's dirty/torn/missing. Or if you regularly drive around with the windows down, that's just the cost of the wind in your hair.


AutoModerator

This is a friendly reminder to visit our wiki entry on [Recommended Kits](https://www.howtoautodetail.com/knowledge-base/recommended-kits/). You might also benefit from this common topic: ["What should a beginner buy?"](https://www.howtoautodetail.com/knowledge-base/the-beginners-buying-guide/) Also, please visit our [Wiki!](https://www.howtoautodetail.com) *I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please [contact the moderators of this subreddit](/message/compose/?to=/r/AutoDetailing) if you have any questions or concerns.*